Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening was a revival movement that swept across America that led to significant social change.

A characteristic of the revival were camp meetings. First done don’t in Kuntucky1, these were meetings that would last for several days in open fields. People would come from as far as 100 miles and camp out to see visiting preachers share about God.

The revival was all over the nation with physical manifestations2 of God under the preaching of Barton Stone3 in the west, to a revival at Yale in the east.4 The revival also created a movement in social activism.5

Footnotes: 1. Facilitated by Presbyterian pastor James McGready. The four day meeting ended with an emotional exhortation. Many physically collapsed at what they called conviction of sin. People were convinced they were experiencing a visitation of the Holy Spirit such as the early church had known at Pentecost. 2. There were some strange physical manifestations - some people fainted and fell to the ground (were “slain in the spirit”) or had uncontrollable shaking. There was dancing, running and singing - all of which the leaders said were manifestations of God's presence. The noise of the meetings was so great that some said “the noise was like the roar of Niagara.” 3. Barton Stone 4. Yale

Manifestations

Leaders

Social change

Members of these societies not only acted as apostles for the faith, but as educators, civic leaders and exponents of Eastern, urban culture. Publication and education societies promoted Christian education; most notable among them was the American Bible Society, founded in 1816. Social activism inspired by the revival gave rise to abolition groups and the Society for the Promotion of Temperance, as well as to efforts to reform prisons and care for the handicapped and mentally ill.

History of the Revival

Impact

Controversies

Good News

Description of the good news

Description of the good news

See Also

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